Researchers Makes Fluorescence Microscopy More Efficient Using Novel 3D Imaging Expertise

Scientists have been utilizing fluorescence microscopy to study the inner workings of biological cells and organisms for many years. Nevertheless, many of these platforms are sometimes too slow to follow the organic action in 3-D; and too damaging to the living organic specimens with strong light illumination.

Researchers Makes Fluorescence Microscopy More Efficient Using Novel 3D Imaging Expertise

To deal with these challenges, a research group guided by Dr. Kevin Tsia, Affiliate Professor of the Department of Electrical and Digital Engineering and Programme Director of Bachelor of Engineering in Biomedical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), developed new optical imaging expertise—coded light-sheet array microscopy (CLAM) – which can carry out 3-D imaging at high speed, and is energy-efficient and delicate enough to preserve residing specimens during scanning at a degree that is not achieved by existing technologies.

This Superior imaging technology was recently published in Light: Science & Applications.

Existing 3D organic microscopy platforms are slow as a result of the entire volume of the specimen has to be sequentially scanned and imaged level-by-level, line-by-line or plane-by-plane.

In these platforms, a single 3-D snapshot requires repeated illumination on the specimen. The specimens are often illuminated with thousands to millions of times extra intensity than that of sunlight.

This is more likely to damage the specimen itself, thus it isn’t favorable for long-term organic imaging for diverse applications like anatomical science, developmental biology and neuroscience.

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